Alumni News Archive

Read the article Welcome to the Genius Factory about our program’s MacArthur “genius” grant winners.

Leon Arredondo (2005) received a Fulbright Scholar grant for Spring – Summer 2011, to teach and conduct research in Costa Rica. He taught “The Global Cocaine Industry: Development, Politics and Control Systems” in the Doctoral Program in Culture and Society Studies at the University of Costa Rica, and is currently conducting a research project on labor and nation-state formation. He has also just been appointed to a tenure track position at West Chester University (a unit of the Pennsylvania state system), starting in Fall 2011. (posted 7/11)

Larisa Honey (2006) has accepted a tenure track position at Queensborough Community College, beginning Fall 2011. (posted 7/11)

Dr. Roberto Abadie‘s book The Professional Guinea Pig: Big Pharma and the Risky World of Human Subjects was recently reviewed in The Chronicle of Higher EducationNatureand the London Review of Books. (posted 10/10)

Dr. Haskel J. Greenfield (PhD 1985) became an Associate Professor in 1989 and a Full Professor in 2000 in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Manitoba. His website is available here. (posted 07/10)

Dr. Charles Menzies (PhD 1998), a Professor of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, has founded New Proposals: Journal of Marxism and Interdisciplinary Inquiry. Dr. Menzies is also coauthor of BC First Nations Studies, and editor of Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Natural Resource Management (University of Nebraska Press, 2006). The latter book examines how traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) is taught and practiced today among Native communities and highlights the different ways of seeing and engaging with the natural world. Professor Menzies has recently published an article in the online journal New Proposals titled Reflections on Work and Activism in the ‘University of Excellence.’ (posted 03/10)

Dr. Roberto Abadie is the recipient of the $40,000 Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Wenner-Gren Foundation to support the writing of his manuscript A Guinea Pig’s Wage: Risk, Body Commodification and the Ethics of Pharmaceutical Research in America. The manuscript is in press with Duke University Press. (posted 02/10)

Dr. Patty Kelly (PhD 2002) now an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at George Washington University, is the author of Lydia’s Open Door: Inside Mexico’s Most Modern Brothel (University of California Press, 2008).  In this ethnographic study, Kelly examines the personal histories and experiences of women who work in the Zona Galactica, a state-run brothel in Tuxtla Gutiérrez, the capital city of Chiapas. By delving into lives that would otherwise go unnoticed, she documents the modernization of the sex industry in the city of Tuxtla during the neoliberal era and illustrates how state-regulated sex became part of a broader effort by the government officials to bring modernity to Chiapas, one of Mexico’s poorest and most conflict-laden states.

Dr. Kelly also had an editorial appear in the Los Angeles Times on March 13, 2008: “Legalize Prostitution: Paying for sex is common. Mexico has decriminalized it. So should the US.”

Professor Kelly has been awarded the Stephens Prize by the American Ethnological Society for her book, Lydia’s Open Door: Mexico’s Most Modern Brothel (University of California Press, 2008). The award was presented at the AAAA meetings in Philadelphia. (posted 12/09)

Dr. Samuel Marquez (PhD 2002) has an entry in the four-volume encyclopedia setCountries and Their Cultures (The Gale Group). Dr. Marquez’s contribution was for Colombia, his parents’ country of birth. Dr. Marquez was mentioned in a recent Daily News article (Nov.17, 2009): Sculpting future doctors: Medical students turn to clay. (posted 12/09)

Dr. Cameron McNeil (PhD 2006) was featured in the article “Before Kisses and Snickers, It Was the Treat of Royalty” (The New York Times, 6/10/03), for her work on the chocolate exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History. “It is a piece of chocolate the size of a nickel and more than 1,500 years old, scraped from the bottom of a pot from an ancient Maya tomb in Honduras,” the article begins. “Cameron L. McNeil…has collected residues, including the one at the museum, from ceramics found in the tombs of the first rulers of Copán, a Maya city-state in Honduras founded in the fifth century.”

Dr. McNeil has published a volume on cacao, Chocolate in Mesoamerica: A Cultural History of Cacao, with University Press of Florida.  In Spring 2008, Cameron’s volume received the Mary Klinger Outstanding New Book award by the Society for Economic Botany, which is among the society’s highest honors. Chair of the Awards Committee Dr. Daniel F. Austin said “While many of us have worked in forests with wild Theobroma, and in areas of cultivation, most of us have a limited exposure to the cultural history of the plants. By bringing together distinct fields into one single resource, Dr. McNeil has done everyone a great service. The story of chocolate is as savory as the product!”  The Mary W. Klinger Book Award was established in 1996 and is annually awarded by the Society for an outstanding book publication. The Society for Economic Botany is the largest international scientific organization fostering and encouraging research and education on the past, present, and future uses of plants by people.  Additionally, Dr. McNeil was selected in 2008 to be the Archaeological Institute of America’s Borowski lecturer on Maya topics; the AIA is flying her to three lecture sites, including the Natural History Museum of Cleveland.  Dr. McNeil’s second book, The Ch’orti’ Area: Past and Present on the Southeastern Maya Periphery, is in press with the University Press of Florida, Gainesville, and is expected in Spring 2009.

Dr. McNeil was recently featured in Lehman Today: “An archeologist who earned her doctorate only three years ago has shattered accepted scientific thinking about the collapse of the ancient Maya civilization. Research published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), led by Dr. Cameron L. McNeil, argues that large-scale deforestation did not cause the collapse of the ancient Maya city of Copan in Honduras, as many had believed.” (posted 12/09)

Dr. Nandini Sikand has a film, Soma Girls, that she co-directed with Alexia Prichard that premieres in New York in November at the Quad Cinema as part of the Mahindra Indo American Arts Council Film Festival. She also has a review of Media Worlds (Ginsburg, Abu-Lughod, Larkin, eds.) in the Fall 2004 edition of Visual Anthropology Review. (updated 10/09)

Dr. David Vine (PhD 2006) is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at American University.  While still a student, he published an article titled “Billions for Brooklyn—No Questions Asked: The Borough’s New Power Brokers” in the Brooklyn Rail; the article received an award from the Independent Press Association/New York Ethnic and Community Press Awards.  He also published an article in the Washington Post titledIsland Of Injustice.  David’s book, Island of Shame: The Secret History of the US Military Base on Diego Garcia, has been published by Princeton University Press.  Read a reviewfrom the New York Review of Books. Additionally, David has published an article on Diego Garcia in Mother Jones magazine’s online edition as part of a feature on US military bases abroad. (posted 5/09)

Dr. Leon Arredondo recently accepted a position as an Associate Dean at Felician College in New Jersey. He is working primarily with all of the off-site programs the college offers throughout the state. (posted 3/09)

Dr. Roberto Lorenzo Abadie is the recipient of the Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Wenner-Gren Foundation to support the writing of his manuscript “A Guinea Pig’s Wage: Risk, Body Commodification and the Ethics of Pharmaceutical Research in America.” He received $40,000. The manuscript is currently in press with Duke University Press. (posted 11/08)

Since September 2007, alum Dr. Raymond Codringtonis Project Manager at the Aspen Institute, Roundtable on Community Change. He manages the Racial Equity and Society seminars, which are designed to provide an opportunity for senior community change leaders to immerse themselves in readings, dialogue and collective work around issues of race, ethnicity, and equity in America and abroad. We convene people from a range of sectors including: philanthropy, government, community based organizations, media and non-profits over the space of four and a half days to address these issues. He is also in the process of developing a number of projects around youth and racism which includes the development of a youth-based curriculum and multimedia products that will help young people understand the implications of structural racism in their lives and society more generally. (posted 11/08)

Laure Bjawi-Levine has held a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of
Anthropology at Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California since 2007. (posted 10/08)

Eliza Darling (PhD 2004) has landed an Early Career Award from Goldsmiths College, University of London, to research her project titled “Fire on the Mountain: The Politics of Country Music in Britain and Ireland.”  In Fall 2008, she will begin a three-year lectureship in the Anthropology Department at Goldsmiths.   She is also currently on a Wenner-Gren Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship (2007-2008), writing a book called “The Sheltering Grove: Wilderness Gentrification in the Adirondack Park.”  (posted 10/08)

Alcira Forero-Pena (Ph.D in Anthropology 2004) has been teaching and doing research as a Visiting Professor at the Universidad del Valle de Guatemala for almost a year, thanks to a Fulbright Scholar Grant (2006-2007). This spring semester she is devoting her time exclusively to ethnographic research on the “Pan-Maya Movement”, particularly on how, why, and when Guatemala indigenous women are articulated in this Movement. Her research looks at the role of education, broadly understood, and that of social practices and ideologies that may empower or challenge particular women and women’s movements to exercise their agency as full human beings, citizens and women. She has given a few lectures on “Interculturalidad” (Interculturality), Gender Wquality, and the Education Reform to students at the UVG’s branch in the Highlands/Altiplano. (posted 1/09)

Congratulations to Russell Hogg (PhD 2008) and Tara Peburn, who have each won a postdoctoral fellowship at the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, University of Missouri School of Medicine. (posted 10/08)

Tina Lee holds a 2008-2009 American Association for University Women (AAUW) American Fellowship ($20,000) and a Sponsored Dissertation Fellowship ($18,000 + in-state tuition). These awards will help her on complete her dissertation: Stratified Reproduction and Definitions of Child Neglect: State Practices and Parents’ Response.(posted 10/08)

Suzana Maia was awarded a Posdoctoral grant in the Research Center for the Study of Indigenous People at the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil, to develop the project: “Encounters and Dialogues: anthropology and the new political subjects.” (posted 10/08)

In 2008-2009, Gail Perry-Ryder received the Public Humanities Fellowship from the New York Council for the Humanities. She has also received a Community Service-Learning Grant from Lehman College/CUNY and The Colin Powell Center for Policy Studies at City College/CUNY.  She also received a Faculty Development Grant at Lehman College Institute for Literacy Studies and the Carnegie Foundation. (posted 10/08)

Amy Schreier (PhD 2008) has won a 2008-2009 postdoctoral fellowship in the Duke University Writing Program. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Roberto Abadie (PhD 2007) is the author of the book Historias de Picos: Narrativas sobre el consumo de drogas intravenosas en los tiempos del SIDA, published in 2003 by Frontera Editorial, Uruguay.  He has recently signed a book contract with Duke University Press for the publication of his manuscript entitled A Guinea Pig’s Wage: Risk, Body Commodification and the Ethics of Pharmaceutical Research in America. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Maria Luisa Achino-Loeb (PhD 1990) is the editor of Silence: the Currency of Power, published in 2006 by Berghahn Books.“This book is about silence, power, and their interaction. We argue that only by studying how silence works can we arrive at the elusive roots of power in all its dimensions. (…)  [W]e look at how silence works in the perception and manipulation of sound, of speech, and of perspective in areas as disparate as music, language, race, work dislocations, and the construction of anthropological subjects.”The book was reviewed in the May 2008 issue of American Ethnologist. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Ana Aparicio (PhD 2004) is the author of Dominican Americans and the Politics of Empowerment (part of the New World Diasporas series edited by Kevin Yelvington, University Press of Florida, 2006), which received the 2006 Association for Latina and Latino Anthropologists Book Award Honorable Mention. She is also the co-editor ofImmigrants, Welfare Reform and the Poverty of Policy (Greenwood, 2004). Currently she is working on a manuscript that focuses on the role of Latino youth in social and racial justice work. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Sylvia Atsalis’ (PhD 1998) research on menopause in captive gorillas has been in the news. It was in the New York Times Science section (1/3/06) and was also written up on the National Geographic news website. She hasalso published two books recently: A natural history of the brown mouse lemur, 2007 (in part based on her 1998 dissertation); and Primate Reproductive Aging (Karger, 2008), ed. S. Atsalis, S. Margulis and P. Hof. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Karen Baab (PhD 2007) has two papers out in the Journal of Human Evolution. One, part of her dissertation, argues that Homo erectus is best considered a single widespread species including other putative species such as Homo ergaster and Homo georgicus; this work used a novel approach to geometric morphometrics and statistical sampling comparing cranial shape variation in fossil humans to that in fossil and modern primate populations. The second is a comment on a paper in Nature which identified a new fossil from East Turkana, Kenya, as a member of Homo erectus, but in this case Baab suggests that her analysis argues against this identification. She also co-authored a review encyclopedia entry on “Fossil humans” with Prof. Eric Delson in the McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology, 10th ed., 2007. She is now a postdoc in Anatomy at Stony Brook University. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Cristiana Bastos (PhD 1996) published an article entitled “Medical Hybridisms and Social Boundaries: Aspects of Portuguese Colonialism in Africa and India in the Nineteenth Century,” in 2007 in the Journal of Southern African Studies. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Hugo Benavides (PhD 1999) has three books out with the University of Texas Press, the most recent in 2008.  They are Melodrama and Culture  Politics Latin American Style(2008), The Politics of Sentiment: Imagining and Remembering Guayaquil (2006), andMaking Ecuadorean Histories: Four Centuries of Defining Power (2004). (posted 10/08)

Dr. Sally S. Booth (PhD 1997) is the recipient of the 2006 Courtney Sale Ross Award for teaching. She recently co-authored, with Jeffrey E. Cole (PhD 1993) Dirty Work: Immigrants in Domestic Service, Agriculture, and Prostitution in Sicily (Lexington Books, 2007). (posted 10/08)

Dr. Elizabeth Chin (PhD 1996) is the author of Purchasing Power: Black Kids and American Consumer Culture, 2001.  In 2007, she was honored by the American Anthropological Association with its prestigious Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. (posted 10/08)  According to the association, Chin is being recognized for her role as an educator and mentor to students both inside and outside the classroom. A cultural anthropologist, she teaches courses concerned with children, the Caribbean (with emphasis on Haiti), consumerism, urban culture, and the anthropology of dance. She has led student groups on one study trip to Cuba and two to Haiti, developed a project to teach anthropological methods to fifth-graders, and designed curriculum for a gang intervention and prevention program. Her research topics include the consumer lives of inner city African American children, the cultural politics of the Barbie Doll, and traditional Haitian dance. She is now working with a professional company maintaining the legacy of Katherine Dunham, an African-American dancer who died recently. Chin has shared her views on anthropology and teaching through multiple commentaries on NPR’s “Tavis Smiley Show.” (posted 10/08)

Dr. Jeffrey E. Cole (PhD 1993) co-authored, with Sally S. Booth (PhD 1997) Dirty Work: Immigrants in Domestic Service, Agriculture, and Prostitution in Sicily (Lexington Books, 2007). (posted 10/08)

Dr. Gerald Creed has recently published The Seductions of Community: Emancipations, Oppressions and Quandaries, 2006; his earlier book is Domesticating Revolution: From Socialist Reform to Ambivalent Transition in a Bulgarian Village, 1998. (posted 10/08)

Bea Vidacs has won a three year post-doctoral fellowship from the Max Plank Institute, Halle, Germany. The wider project of which hers is a part is entitled Economy and Ritual and is being led by Chris Hann and Stephen Gudeman. Her own study, involving 6-9 months of fieldwork, will be a restudy of the Hungarian village where she did previous research on strategies of choosing godparents. (posted 01/09)

Gabriela Zamorano was awarded a 2008-2009 postdoctoral grant at the Museé du Quai Branly in Paris to develop a research project on early ethnographic photography in South America. (posted 10/08)

Lynne deSilva-Johnson won a summer teaching Fellowship and advisory position at the new Bard Urban Institute in New Orleans, to work with undergraduates from all over the country and abroad on urban planning/theory, policy, social action, and community service – as well as serving in a “theory-to-practice” advisement role. (posted 10/08)

Nomi Stone received a fellowship from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities to write poetry during the Summer of 2008. (posted 10/08)

Congratulations to Dr. Dana Davis (PhD 2001) for the publication of her book, Battered Black Women and Welfare Reform: Between a Rock and a Hard Place, with SUNY Press in its African American Studies Series. In Fall 2008, the book was reviewed by Jafari Sinclaire Allen in American Anthropologist (110:3). (posted 10/08)

Dr. Kirk Dombrowski (PhD 1998) recently took over as co-editor, with fellow Graduate Center alum Anthony Marcus, of Dialectical Anthropology, founded by Stanley Diamond in 1975. Kirk is the author of Against Culture: Development, Politics, And Religion in Indian Alaska (University of Nebraska Press, 2002). (posted 10/08)

Dr. Walter A. Ewing (PhD 1997), a research associate at the Immigration Policy Center, published “Beyond Border Enforcement: Enhancing National Security Through Immigration Reform,” Georgetown Journal of Law and Public Policy, Vol. V: 427. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Judith N. Freidenberg, now at the University of Maryland’s Department of Anthropology, has published Memorias de Villa Clara (Antropofagia, Buenos Aires, 2005).  The book has been reviewed in Intersecciones en Antropología (December/January 2006). (posted 10/08)

Dr. Khaled Furani (PhD 2004) has published an article in American Ethnologist (May 2008) entitled “Rhythms of the Secular.” (posted 10/08)

Dr. Murphy Halliburton (PhD 2000) recently received tenure in the Anthropology Department at Queens College.  He has a contract for his forthcoming book with Left Coast Press; the book is tentatively titled Mudpacks and Prozac: Psychiatric Healing and Medical Pluralism in South India. It is an ethnographic analysis of treatment in biomedical, ayurvedic, and religious psychiatric healing centers, and offers insights about pleasure, modernity, and time. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Tina Harris has an article forthcoming in India Review and a book review in Gender, Place and Culture in 2008. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Katerina Harvati (PhD 2001) has received extensive coverage in the Greek daily press on her research on a Neanderthal tooth from her field site at Lakonis, Greece, where she has conducted research since graduate school. To read news articles on Dr. Harvati’s research on the mobility of Neanderthal populations, see: MSNBC or USA Today. (posted 10/08)

PhD Program in Anthropology alums have authored a key study which shows that Neanderthals were not the ancestors of modern humans.  Katerina Harvati (PhD 2001),Stephen Frost (PhD 2001), and Kieran P. McNulty (PhD 2003) “combined their separately-collected data in order to solve a long-held question in paleoanthropology,” writes Professor Eric Delson. “Are Neanderthals best considered a subspecies of our own species…or members of a separate species? Their study, based on advanced methods in statistical analysis of three-dimensional data (geometric morphometrics) argues forcefully for the latter result.” Dr. Harvarti is currently at the Max Planck Institute, Dr. Frost is a Postdoctoral Associate in Anatomy at the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine in Old Westbury, and Dr. McNulty is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Baylor University in Texas. Their research was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and has garnered press coverage from The New York Times and elsewhere.

Dr. Jonathan Hearn (PhD 1997) has published two books: Rethinking Nationalism: a Critical Introduction. Palgrave Macmillan, 2006 and Claiming Scotland: National Identity and Liberal Culture, Polygon, 2000. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Erin Martineau is,with Cheryl C. Smith and Judith Summerfield, co-editor of the forthcoming volume Transformative Spaces: Designing Creative Sites for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.  The volume, under contract with Springer Publishing, is anticipated in June 2009. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Eric McGuckin (PhD 1997) has most recently published “Conspicuous Experience: Extreme Travel and Competitive Leisure in the 21st Century,” in Loisir et Liberte en Amerique du Nord (2008, University of Paris Press). His dissertation was “Postcards from Shangri-La: Tibetans, Tourism and the Politics of Cultural Production.” (posted 10/08)

Dr. Sophia Perdikaris (PhD 1998) was the keynote speaker at The Graduate Center’s Student Orientation on August 19, 2008.  She held a named professorship for two years (Leonard and Claire Tow Professor) and is now (2008–11) an Honorary Fellow of the School of Science and Engineering, Department of Geoscience, University of Edinburgh, UK. She has two forthcoming publications: a chapter in a book entitled “Beyond the Catch” and a chapter in a UCLA edited volume: “Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A Global Perspective.” For the last five years, under a Gates Foundation-funded initiative called STAR— a partnership between Brooklyn College and Erasmus High School—she has been teaching a series of seminars and workshops to high school students preparing them for college. She has also been teaching for the Honors College for four years and gives regular seminars at the American Museum of Natural History and the Long Island Children’s Museum. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Cosimo Sgarlata published an article about his field research in Hamden, Connecticut, in the Connecticut Historical Preservation Commission Newsletter. The fieldwork included the discovery of a previously unidentified Middle Archaic site (7,000-8,000 years old).

Dr. Jonathan Shannon (PhD 2001) gave the TIAA-CREF Distinguished Lecture at Hunter College in Spring 2008.  He is the author of Among the Jasmine Trees: Music and Modernity in Contemporary Syria, (Wesleyan University Press, 2006) in which he explores how music in Syria shapes debates about Arab society and culture. He was the recipient of the 2001 Malcolm H. Kerr Award for Outstanding Dissertation in the Social Sciences. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Melissa Tallman collaborated with postdoc Will Harcourt-Smith, alum Steve Frost (PhD 2001), adjunct Prof. James Rohlf, Prof. Eric Delson and colleague David Wiley (UC Davis) on a chapter describing a new approach to individualization of bones using geometric morphometrics. It appeared in the book edited by alums Eric J. Sargis and Marian Dagosto: Mammalian Evolutionary Morphology: A Tribute to Frederick S. Szalay.Szalay was a professor in the program for many years. The book forms part of the seriesVertebrate Paleobiology & Paleoanthropology, published by Springer (Dordrecht, Netherlands) and edited by Prof. Delson and adjunct Prof. Ross MacPhee. Melissa is also writing a chapter with Harcourt-Smith for a book she is editing in this series. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Lawrence F. Van Horn (PhD 1977) was awarded, on April 28, 2007, the prestigious Omer C. Stewart Memorial Award for “exemplary achievement” by the High Plains Society for Applied Anthropology. Dr. Van Horn is the fifteenth annual recipient of this award, which recognizes his current editorship of the internationally known journal Applied Anthropologist, his book reviews and articles in various professional anthropological journals, and his ethnographic reports over the years as a U.S. National Park Service anthropologist of American Indians, African Americans, and other groups with cultural heritage links to what are now units of the National Park System. A long-time anthropology professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder, Dr. Omer Stewart (1908–91) was a pioneer in applied anthropology. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Alisse Waterson (PhD 1990) is a tenured Professor of Anthropology, John Jay College of Criminal Justice. She has two new edited volumes: An Anthropology of War: Views from the Frontlines (Berghahn Books 2008) and, with Maria D. Vesperi,Anthropology of the Shelf: Anthropologists on Writing (Wiley Blackwell 2009). Dr. Waterston also serves as Chair, AAA Committee on the Future of Print and Electronic Publishing charged with guiding policy on the AAA’s transition to digital publishing. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Jarrett Zigon (PhD 2006) has a forthcoming book, Morality: An Anthropological Perspective which will be published by Berg Press (2008). He has published the following chapters in edited collections: “Moral Responses to an HIV/AIDS Epidemic: A Comparison of Russian Orthodox Church, Secular NGO and Russian Government Discourse and Practice,” in Health Capital and Sustainable Economic Development, Patricia Cholewka, ed., (CRC Press, 2008); “The Russian Orthodox Church and Harm Reduction,” in Effective and Conclusive Narcology in the Epoch of HIV (Media Press, 2008); “Aleksandra Vladimirovna: Moral Narratives of a Russian Orthodox Woman,” in Reclaiming the Sacred, Catherine Wanner and Mark Steinberg, eds., (Woodrow Wilson Center Press, forthcoming); “Life-History and Personal Experience: The Moral Conceptions of a Former Heroin Addict,” in The Anthropology of Moralities, Monica Heinz, ed., (Berghahn Press, forthcoming).  His journal articles include: “Moral Breakdown and the Ethical Demand: A Theoretical Framework for an Anthropology of Moralities,” Anthropological Theory (2007); and   “Developing the Moral Person: The Concepts of Human, Godmanhood, and Feelings in some Russian Articulations of Morality,” Anthropology of Consciousness (forthcoming). (posted 10/08)

Dr. Ana Aparicio (PhD 2004) recently moved to Northwestern University, where she is a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Anthropology Department. Formerly, she was an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at U-Mass Boston and also an affiliate of the Gaston Institute for Latino Community Development and Policy. She is the author of Dominican Americans and the Politics of Empowerment (part of the New World Diasporas series edited by Kevin Yelvington, University Press of Florida, 2006). (posted 10/08)

Dr. Sylvia Atsalis (PhD 1998) is a Research Associate and Grants Manager at the Lincoln Park Zoological Society. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Karen Baab (PhD 2007) has a two-year position as a Postdoctoral Associate in Anatomical Sciences at Stony Brook University. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Richard A. Bergl (PhD 2006) is Curator of Conservation and Research, North Carolina Zoological Park, Asheboro, NC. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Laure Bjawi-Levine has held a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of
Anthropology at Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California since 2007. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Julian Brash (PhD 2006) is a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Toledo, OH. He has a forthcoming book with Cornell University Press in its new Metropolitan Ethnography series. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Melanie Bush (PhD 2002) is now an Assistant Professor in the Anthropology and Sociology Department at Adelphi University. She recently moved from Brooklyn College. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Terence Capellini (PhD 2007) was a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Dr. Licia Selleri at Cornell University Medical Center studying developmental genetics; as of May 2008, he has begun working as a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Dr. David Kingsley at Stanford University, studying evolutionary developmental biology. (posted 10/08)

As of Summer 2008, Dr. Jeffrey E. Cole (PhD 1993) has left Dowling College and was appointed Professor and Chair of Anthropology at Connecticut College in New London. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Eliza Darling (PhD 2004)is a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Anthropology of Goldsmiths College, London.  In 2007-2008, she held a Hunt Fellowship from the Wenner-Gren Foundation to support the completion of her book on gentrification in the Adirondacks.  She will begin a three-year lectureship in the Anthropology Department at Goldsmiths College, University of London, in Autumn 2008.  (posted 10/08)

Dr. Dana-ain Davis (PhD 2001) recently joined the Urban Studies department at Queens College, where she is an Associate Professor. She moved there from SUNY Purchase. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Molly Doane (PhD 2001) was recently appointed a tenure-track Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Anthropology and Geography. Previously she was a tenure-track Assistant Professor at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Kirk Dombrowski (PhD 1998) has been promoted to an Associate Professor of Anthropology at John Jay College, CUNY. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Susan Falls (PhD 2005) has recently taken a job as Professor of Anthropology at Savannah College of Art and Design. Previously, she was a visiting Assistant Professor at Temple University. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Alcira Forero-Pena (PhD 2004) has been teaching and doing research as a visiting professor at the Universidad del Valle de Guatemala (UVG) for almost a year with the support of a Fulbright Scholar Grant (2006-07). In Spring 2007, she devoted her time to ethnographic research on the involvement of women in the Pan-Maya Movement. She has also given lectures on “Interculturalidad,” gender equality, and education reform at UVG’s branch in the Highlands/Altiplano. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Khaled Furani (PhD 2004) was recently hired as an Assistant Professor in the department of Sociology and Anthropology at Tel-Aviv University. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Ann Golob (PhD 1982) was named the new LI Index director at Rauch, a group whose research has been the driving force behind public policy in recent years. (posted 10/08)

Dr. M. Katherine (Katy) Gonder (PhD 2000) is a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Biology at the University at Albany, SUNY.

Dr. Edith Gonzalez de Scollard (PhD 2008) has recently been appointed as Associate Director, Federal Programs, Government Relations and Strategic Project Development, the American Museum of Natural History.  Formerly she was the Director of Education Programs at the Long Island Children’s Museum. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Reiko Mastuda Goodwin (PhD 2007), a postdoctoral researcher at the National Institute of Informatics (NII), Tokyo, Japan, collaborates with informatics scientists and epidemiologists on a project called “BioCaster,” which alerts the general public regarding outbreaks of various infectious diseases in the world. She is also a scientist-in-residence in the Anthropology Department, Lehman College, CUNY. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Johanna Gorelick (PhD 2005) is manager of public programs at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, located in the former United States Custom House in Lower Manhattan. Dr. Gorelick was mentioned in “Finding Beauty in Usefulness” (New York Times, Friday, September 22, 2006) a review of the opening of the Diker Pavilion for Native Arts and Cultures at the museum’s George Gustav Heye Center. Dr. Gorelick selected 77 examples of objects from the museum’s collection for the cases in the Diker Pavilion: clothing, tools, musical instruments, games and sports equipment, masks, and pottery representing cultures throughout the Western hemisphere. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Kenneth Guest (PhD 2001) recently received tenure and a promotion to Associate Professor in Baruch College’s Department of Sociology/Anthropology.

Dr. Murphy Halliburton (PhD 2000) recently received tenure in the Anthropology Department at Queens College.  He has a contract for his forthcoming book with Left Coast Press; the book is tentatively titled Mudpacks and Prozac: Psychiatric Healing and Medical Pluralism in South India. It is an ethnographic analysis of treatment in biomedical, ayurvedic, and religious psychiatric healing centers, and offers insights about pleasure, modernity, and time. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Katerina Harvati (PhD 2001) was the subject of recent reports in the Greek daily press, including an interview with the Sunday magazine of the Kathimerini newspaper. International news organizations (AOL, Yahoo, MSN, USA Today) also reported on a paper Dr. Harvati and the Max Planck Institute team published in the Journal of Archeological Science. The subject of the paper was their discovery of a 40,000-year-old tooth that gives proof of Neanderthal mobility. The Neanderthal tooth was discovered on the Lakonis archeological site in Greece, where Dr. Harvati has been working since her days as a graduate student. (posted 2/08) In January, Dr. Harvati, along with an international team of scientists, was recognized by Time. The magazine named the team’s recent research on the Hofmeyr early modern human fossil from South Africa as one of the top ten scientific discoveries of 2007. The international team of scientists published their report, “Late Pleistocene Human Skull from Hofmeyr, South Africa, and Modern Human Origins” inScience 315:5809 (12 January 2007): 226-229. A report can also be read in Science Daily. (posted 1/08) Harvati is adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology at The Graduate Center and senior researcher, department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute of Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, German.  She was invited, with Eric Delson, Professor of Anthropology at the Graduate Center and Lehman College, to write a “News & Views” commentary for Nature about an article reporting new dates for the last known Neanderthals in Europe. They were interviewed about this work by The New York Times, Science, the Associated Press, Reuters, New Scientist, National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered,” the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the WHYfiles (University of Wisconsin online), Bloomberg news, CNN Radio, LiveScience (online) and other media outlets. Dr. Harvati’s book, Neanderthals Revisited: New Approaches and Perspectives (co-edited with T. Harrison of NYU), will appear later this year in the book series Vertebrate Paleobiology and Paleoanthropology (Springer), edited by Dr. Delson and Ross MacPhee, adjunct Professor of Anthropology at The Graduate Center, and curator in the department of mammalogy at the American Museum of Natural History. (posted 10/08)

Alum G. Derrick Hodge (PhD 2005) is Visiting Assistant Professor at University of Missouri-Kansas City for 2008-2009. (posted 10/08)

Russell Hogg (PhD 2008) is a postdoctoral fellow and lecturer, Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, University of Missouri School of Medicine. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Rebecca Jabbour (PhD 2008) is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Berkeley.  She is currently working on outreach and education projects with the Human Evolution Research Center and the UC Museum of Paleontology and continuing her research on skeletal variation in apes. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Patty Kelly (PhD 2002) was recently appointed a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Anthropology at George Washington University. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Aisha Khan (PhD 1995) is Associate Professor of Anthropology at New York University.  She moved to NYU from the Department of Anthropology at SUNY Stony Brook. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Joshua Linder (PhD 2008) is a visiting Assistant Professor (2007-present) at the Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Suzana Maia (PhD 2007) was awarded a Posdoctoral grant in the Research Center for the Study of Indigenous People at the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil, to develop the project: “Encounters and Dialogues: anthropology and the new political subjects.” (posted 10/08)

Dr. Anthony Marcus (PhD 1998) after a year as Associate Provost at the Kazakhstan Institute of Management, Economics, and Strategic Research (KIMEP), has taken a position as Associate Professor at John Jay College’s Department of Anthropology, and will be Editor-in-Chief of Dialectical Anthropology, along with fellow alum Kirk Dombrowski. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Erin Martineau (PhD 2006) is Associate for Teaching, Learning, and Research in the Office of Undergraduate Education, CUNY Central Office (80th Street). (posted 10/08)

Dr. Shannon McFarlin (PhD 2006) has a position as a postdoctoral research scientist in the Department of Anthropology and the Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology at George Washington University. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Eric McGuckin (PhD 1997) has recently become Director of the Hutchins School of Liberal Studies at Sonoma State University, where he is Associate Professor of Anthropology. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Kelly McKinney (PhD 2003) is a postdoctoral fellow, Social Studies of Medicine, at McGill University. (posted 10/08)

Alum James McMahon (PhD 1999) is an Assistant Professor at the University of Rochester Medical Center, School of Nursing. Prior to joining the URMC faculty in 2007, Dr. McMahon was Principal Investigator at the National Development and Research Institutes (NDRI) in New York City, where he was a project director for a NIH-funded project studying the spread of HIV and Hepatitis B and C in East Harlem. On May 12, 2008, he was honored with the Outstanding Faculty Colleague Award from the University of Rochester School of Nursing. The award is bestowed annually to the faculty member whose “help and guidance are frequently sought by individuals to enhance the quality of their endeavors in education, research, and/or practice.” (posted 10/08)

Dr. Rachel Nuger (PhD 2008) started a tenure-track position in August at Moorpark College in Moorpark, CA in Fall 2008. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Janet Page (PhD 1999) has been working on issues of Food Stamp participation, hunger, local agriculture, food security, and fitness with a number of nonprofits.  Previously, she directed a Food Stamp Participation project with the New Mexico Association of Food Banks.  Currently, she is helping coordinate a Kellogg-sponsored networking project on Food and Fitness, and has begun a position as a Strategic Planner with St. Joseph Community Health on an obesity prevention initiative for an area of Albuquerque.  She is also on the Board of the Rio Grande Farmers’ Guild and Cooperative, part of a nonprofit Food Stamp Working Group to improve Food Stamp policy in New Mexico, and is an adjunct in the Department of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico. (posted 10/08)

As of August 2008, Tara Peburn holds a postdoctoral position at the University of Missouri School of Medicine in the Department of Anatomy and Pathological Sciences. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Sophia Perdikaris (PhD 1998) was recently promoted to Professor, Department of Anthropology and Archeology, Brooklyn College, and is a member of the doctoral faculty in anthropology at The Graduate Center. She works in Iceland and Barbuda and specializes in environmental archaeology and zooarchaeology. The majority of her work has been in the Viking North Atlantic, but she has added Barbuda as an extreme geographic comparison to the study and effects of global change.  For the past eight years she has run a Research Experience for Undergraduates Program funded by NSF Polar Programs and has taken both undergraduates and graduate students into the field. She held a named professorship for two years (Leonard and Claire Tow Professor) and is now (2008–11) an Honorary Fellow of the School of Science and Engineering, Department of Geoscience, University of Edinburgh, UK. For the last five years, under a Gates Foundation-funded initiative called STAR— a partnership between Brooklyn College and Erasmus High School—she has been teaching a series of seminars and workshops to high school students preparing them for college. She has also been teaching for the Honors College for four years and gives regular seminars at the American Museum of Natural History and Long Island Children’s Museum. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Charles R. Price (PhD 2001) is a tenure-track Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Sabyiha Robin Prince (PhD 2000) is a tenured Assistant Professor in the Anthropology Department at American University. (posted 10/08)

Andrea Queeley is beginning her second year as the Zemurray Stone Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow at The Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Kelley Ready (PhD 2000) is now a Research Scientist in the Sustainable International Development program at the Heller School for Social Policy and Development at Brandeis University. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Gustavo Lins Ribeiro was elected as vice-president of the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES) during its last congress in Kunming, China. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Alfred Rosenberger (PhD 1979) has been promoted to Professor at Brooklyn College. He is a specialist on the evolution and systematics of New World monkeys.

Dr. Aseel Sawalha (PhD 2002) recently received tenure and a promotion to Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Pace University. (posted 10/08)

Amy Schreier (PhD 2008) has won a postdoctoral fellowship in the Duke University Writing Program. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Jonathan Shannon (PhD 2001) was recently promoted to tenured Associate Professor of Anthropology at Hunter College.  He is the author of Among the Jasmine Trees: Music and Modernity in Contemporary Syria, (Wesleyan University Press, 2006) in which he explores how music in Syria shapes debates about Arab society and culture. He was the recipient of the 2001 Malcolm H. Kerr Award for Outstanding Dissertation in the Social Sciences. In Spring 2008, he gave the TIAA-CREF Distinguished Lecture at Hunter College. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Elizabeth A. Ten Dyke (PhD 1997) is the Director of Instructional Services for the Kingston City School District in Kingston, New York. Most recently she served on the Research Committee at the National Council for the Social Studies. In addition to academic publications, Dr. Ten Dyke has also authored numerous secondary level curriculum units for the Social Studies School Service and the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. (posted 10/08)

Recent graduate Dr. Nelson Ting (PhD 2008) has accepted a position as a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the department of anthropology, University of Iowa. As of Autumn 2008, he will also be a principal investigator at the University of Iowa’s Roy J. Carver Center for Comparative Genomics, where he has received start-up funds to build a program in molecular anthropology. He will have a genetics lab and will be conducting fieldwork. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Patricia Tovar (PhD 2005) is newly appointed as an Associate Professor in the Anthropology Department at John Jay College. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Bea Vidacs (PhD 2002) is now an adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology/Anthropology at Pace University. (posted 10/08)

Dr. David Vine (PhD 2006) is a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Anthropology at American University. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Danning Wang (PhD 2002) is working as an instructor with the Chinese University of Hong Kong.  She writes “The anthropology department here is a wonderful place for me to study mainland China. I received the Direct Research Grant for year 2008 to conduct follow-up research in my working-class neighborhood in Tianjin.” (posted 10/08)

Dr. Ara Wilson (PhD 1997) was appointed an Associate Professor with tenure in Women’s Studies at Duke University, where she is the director of Sexuality Studies, a certificate program in Women’s Studies. She took up this appointment in Fall 2006 when she moved from Ohio State University. (posted 10/08)

Dr. Thomas M. Wilson (PhD 1985) moved to a position as Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology of Binghamton University, State University of New York in 2002, after twelve years as a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in The Queen’s University of Belfast, Northern Ireland. Since 2007 he has been Chair of the Binghamton Department of Anthropology. He is currently (2008-10) President of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe, and for the last nine years has been co-editor of the journal Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power.

Alum Jim Woollett (PhD 2003) is in the fourth year of his position as a tenure-track Professor of prehistoric archaeology in the Department d’Histoire at the Université Laval in Québec City, Québec.  He is involved in International Polar Year funded research projects in both Labrador and Iceland. (posted 10/08)

Janette Yarwood has been named the 2008-2009 Northeast Consortium for Faculty Diversity Visiting Dissertation Scholar at Monmouth University ($32,000). This In-Residence fellowship also provides computer and library privileges, office space, health insurance, and a cordial faculty liaison. There are no work or teaching requirements, and she will have the opportunity to network with fellows and faculty from other network schools (Northeastern, Colgate, Allegheny, Middlebury, University of Vermont, University of Rochester, and others). (posted 10/08)

Dr. Kee Howe Yong (PhD 2003) began an appointment as a tenure-track Assistant Professor at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. (posted 10/08)

Gabriela Zamorano, a doctoral student in anthropology, was awarded a postdoctoral grant at the Musée du quai Branly in Paris to develop her research project “An archaeology of ethnographic portraiture in South America (1841–1920).” (posted 10/08)

Dr. Jarrett Zigon (PhD 2006) has held a three-year position as Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle, Germany.  As of January 2009, he will be Assistant Professor at the Department of Social Anthropology, University of Amsterdam.  (posted 10/08)

Dr. Abraham Lotha published History of Naga Anthropology, 1832-1947 (Chumpo Museum Publication, Dimapur, Nagaland, 2007). This monograph, based on Lotha’s research for his master’s degree in cultural anthropology, deals with writings by British colonial administrators and ethnographers about the inhabitants of the far northeastern part of India. Nagas first came in contact with the British in 1832; the contact ended in 1947, the year the Raj dissolved and the British officially left the Naga Hills. Reviewing the book in The Morung Express on February 14, 2008, Paul Pimomo called Abraham Lotha “a meticulous scholar and a reliable commentator on Naga history and cultures.” He added, “The book is a must read for all scholars in Naga studies, not just Naga anthropologists. Its brevity does not take away from the merits of the book, chief of which is Abraham Lotha’s ability to condense a century’s worth of historical information into two chapters, followed by a critique of colonial anthropology and its legacy in contemporary Nagaland written with remarkable critical candor.” (posted 4/08)

Dr. James McMahon (PhD 1999) has recently published “Neonatal pain facial expression: Evaluating the primal face of pain” in Pain, and “Intranasal transmission of hepatitis C virus: Virological and clinical evidence” in Clinical Infectious Diseases (2008), 47:931-934. He is also currently involved in numerous research projects, including “Cognitive Rehabilitation for Substance Abusers: Towards HIV Prevention,” “Diffusion of HIV-1 in Emerging Male Sex Work Venues in Southeast Asia (R01),” and “Barriers to Treatment-Based HIV Prevention for IDU Couples (R21).”

In Spring 2007, Banu Karaca and Ceren Özgül co-organized an interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference entitled “Historical Continuities, Political Responsibilities: Unsettling Conceptual Blind-Spots in Ottoman and Turkish Studies” together with other students from The Graduate Center, Columbia University, and NYU. Addressing the scholarly and political legacies of Ottoman and national historiographies in studies of Turkey, the Middle East and Eastern Europe, this two-day conference featured over 30 presentations by participants from the U.S., Canada, Turkey and Germany. It was sponsored by a professional development grant from the Graduate Center’s Provost’s Office, the Department of Anthropology, the Middle East and Middle Eastern American Center (MEMEAC), the Doctoral Student Council (DSC), the Middle East Studies Organization (MESO). Co-hosted by the Wilf Department of Politics (MA Program) at New York University, the conference received additional support from the Center for International History at Columbia University. For more information please visithttp://unsettlingblindspots.info.

In academic year 2007-2008, Kirk Dombrowski (PhD 1998) won a number of grants: NSF Cultural Scholars Award (PI) “Stochastic Modeling of Injecting Drug User Network Factors in HIV Stabilization Dynamics,” $41,000 (one year); NIH/NIJ RO1(co-PI) “Structure of Methamphetamine Markets in NYC,” $475,000 (two years); NIJ (Multi-City Initiative (co-PI) “The Sexual Exploitation of Underage Children in New York City,” $64,000 (one year); NYCJS (co-PI) “Immigrant Victims of Violence in Nassau County New York,” $160,000 (two years); and NIJ Center for Court Innovation (co-PI) “Community Reactions to Philadelphia Community Courts,” $45,000 (one year).

Ragnar Edvardsson has received a grant for $49,000 from the Icelandic Archaeological Fund for research on a Basque whaling station from the 17th century.

Roberto Abadie has won a post-doctoral Research Fellowship in the Biomedical Ethics and Genomics Research Program of the Mayo Clinic of Medicine.

Congratulations to Joshua Moses who in 2006 was awarded the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) for Individual Predoctoral Fellows (F31).

David Vine received a one-year appointment as “Public Anthropologist in Residence” at American University.

Albina Hulda Palsdottir recently won the University Student Senate Collegiate Award

Russell Hogg has won an NSF Anthropology Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Award.

Molly Hurley won a National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant to support her dissertation fieldwork. The title of her project is “Beyond Sectarianism?: Violence After Peace Accords in Belfast, Northern Ireland.”

Tina Lee received a Wenner-Gren Dissertation Fieldwork Grant for $23,302 for her project entitled: “Stratified Reproduction and Definitions of Child Neglect: State Practices and Parents’ Response.”

Ramona Harrison and Albina Hulda Palsdottir have both been awarded the prestigious Leifur Eiríksson Foundation Scholarships. Ramona Harrison’s grant was for her research on ‘Analysis of medieval faunal remains from the Eyjafjord area in NE Iceland.’ Her project focuses on trade relations and subsistence strategies at the medieval trading site Gásir (NE Iceland) and its context within the North Atlantic. Relevant course work at the University of Reykjavik will help process the data resulting from the project. Research entails zooarchaeological analysis of faunal remains and a survey that will test the potential for comparative midden material at the medieval monastic site at Mö_ruvellir. The resulting data will form the basis for a PhD dissertation, and is to be published in site reports and articles, thus adding to the body of knowledge in the field of archaeology.

Albina Hulda Palsdottir’s research is focused on the archaeofauna from the late medieval (ca. 1493-1554) Augustinian monastery of Skriethuklaustur in East Iceland which can shed light on the various functions of the monastery as an institution in Icelandic medieval society. Analysis of the animal bones can show whether the monastery was being provisioned by outside farms or if it produced its own food. The presence of marine mammals and fish such as seals, haddock and cod at an inland site like Skriethuklaustur can be seen as an indication of the monastery’s role as a landowner, as land rent in medieval Iceland was usually paid in goods such as dried fish. The dietary habits of the monastery’s inhabitants are very interesting as the food consumed is likely to have differed from that eaten at traditional farmsteads. The excavation at Skriethuklaustur has revealed that the monastery likely functioned as a hospice and food would have featured in the nursing and healing that took place there. Coming to The Graduate Center, CUNY to conduct this research was an obvious choice as the Hunter and Brooklyn College laboratories house extensive reference collections of fauna from the North Atlantic, as well as years of faculty experience in working with Icelandic material.

Dr. Gerrie Casey (Asst. Prof. of Anthropology, John Jay College, CUNY Graduate Center PhD 2002) won a Post-Doctoral Writing Fellowship from the Centre for Cosmopolitan Studies, housed at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada.  She will be in residence in Montreal for the spring semester of 2006, working on a book manuscript under the direction of Nigel Rapport, Canada Research Chair in Globalization, Citizenship and Social Justice.

Dr. Gus Carbonella (PhD 1998) has published a book entitled Fierce Localism: The Politics of Ethnicity, Class and Locality in a New England Town (Berghahn, 2006).

Christine Hegel has won a IIE Fulbright Grant for Graduate Research Abroad and an International Dissertation Research Fellowship from the Social Science Research Council. The grants will fund her research (“Law-mindedness and Social Mobility in Egypt”) from January 2005 through December 2005. Christine currently holds a CUNY Instructional Technology fellowship at Staten Island College.

Dr. Anthony Marcus (PhD 1998) is, with David Burner, the author of America Firsthand: Volumes One and Two, published by Bedford/St. Martin’s Press, 2006, and ofWhere Have All the Homeless Gone? The Making and Unmaking of a Crisis. NY: Berghahn Press, 2005.

Alumni – we’d love to know your news! Please contact anthro.news@gmail.com with any updates regarding your latest activities.

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